Cody, WY. // Buffalo Bill State Park

By Maggie -- Aug 15, 2014

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"Cody Is Rodeo"

The town of Cody was not on our radar until we met a lady on Instagram who lives there and owns Western Canvas Wyoming, a shop specializing in custom TeePees. How awesome is that? We wanted to meet her and see her shop, so we headed in that direction. It felt strange driving east again, as our mentality and rhythm now is "west west west!". In a way, leaving Yellowstone felt so good and so freeing. No more buff jams, no more gift shops, no more regulations and passes and reservations. Just the open road again.

The drive through Shoshone National Forest is steep, dramatic and humbling. Ryan is such a great driver - There's no way I could handle the sharp turns and steep grades while hauling a trailer. He's the bomb and I am a proud (and thankful) wifey. Once we entered Buffalo Bill State Park to camp for the night, I had a flood of memories rush in - I had been to Cody before and remembered the famous Cody Nite Rodeo from our Ashla Family Epic Road Trip Adventure. The rodeo goes on every night in the summer at 8pm. We had to go!

$20 gets you a seat at the rodeo. We got up in the front row and had a blast watching the cowboys do their thing in the dirt under the bright lights. The guy sitting next to us was an old cowboy from upstate New York. "There must be some kind of idiot school these kids go to where they learn this stuff," he said about the bull riders, some of them as young as 17. I grimaced at the sight of each one of them launching like ragdolls off of the bulls. It always looked like the bull's foot was centimeters away from crushing their skulls as they hit the ground. Somehow they all scurried away before impact. Pure entertainment, mostly for tourists, but nevertheless a damn good time.

We never got to meet Rebecca from Western Canvas, as she was out busy with clients. We were bummed we missed each other, but glad that getting in touch with her brought us to Cody. It was worth the stop. There is so much to explore in Wyoming, one week was not enough to scratch the surface.